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OCTOBER 2020 EVENT (WED 14 OCT, 2 PM EDT/11 AM PDT)

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(Zoom account required. See below.)

THE RIDDLE OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES – Eric Herbst (Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia)

In addition to stars, galaxies such as our own Milky Way contain interstellar matter, much of which is condensed into so-called interstellar clouds consisting of gas and nanoparticles known as dust grains. The clouds, ranging in size from a few to 100's of light years in extent, are of great interest as the ultimate sites of star and planetary formation. The denser clouds contain large numbers of molecules in the gas phase, mainly organic in nature, divided into classes of molecules dependent upon the age and physical nature of the clouds. Molecules are also observed in ice mantles of cold dust particles. Two distinctive classes of gaseous molecules are known as "carbon chains" and "complex organic molecules (COMs)". Carbon chains are exotic, very unsaturated, and often linear, whereas COMs resemble small terrestrial organic solvents, consisting of amines, alcohols, esters, etc. Until recently, based on observations, it was thought that carbon chains exist solely in cold dense clouds, whereas COMs exist in warmer regions in which star formation is occurring, known as "hot cores." More recently, COMs have been discovered in cold regions as well, introducing more complexity into our understanding of their chemistry. This talk will be concerned mainly with the local build-up chemistry thought to form COMs in both types of sources, and the degree of success that has been achieved.

FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN THE TRANSLUCENT CLOUD VIA TOP-DOWN PROCESSING ON DUST GRAINS – Ko-Ju Chuang,* (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy)

Interstellar complex organic molecules (COMs) have been identified toward various star-forming regions from translucent clouds to the solar system. Interstellar sugar-like species (CnH2nOn) have been intensively studied along with the bottom-up approaches; the ice chemistry scheme of CO-H2CO-CH3OH through "energetic" and/or "non-energetic" processing on dust grains. However, the icy origin of acetaldehyde and its (de-)hydrogenated derivatives (C2HnO), which are often observed in molecular clouds before CO freezes out, remains unclear. In this talk, I will present the laboratory study on the solid-state reactions that involve C2H2, which is one of the common hydrocarbon fragments of PAHs or hydrogenated carbonaceous dust (HAC) in the top-down scenario, and H/OH-radicals along with the H2O formation/destruction sequence on grain surfaces under molecular cloud conditions. It is concluded that C2H2 readily acts as a molecular backbone providing a solid-state route for the formation of COMs, such as ketene (CH2CO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), vinyl alcohol (CH2CHOH), ethanol (CH3CH2OH), and possibly acetic acid (CH3COOH). The reaction network linking the above complex species described by the formula C2HnO is present.
*Dr. Chuang received Honorable Mention in the 2020 competition for the Astrochemistry Subdivision Dissertation Award.


SEPTEMBER 2020 EVENT (WED 9 SEP, 2 PM EDT/11 AM PDT)

THE MOLECULAR UNIVERSE – Alexander Tielens (Leiden Observatory, Leiden University and Astronomy Department, University of Maryland)

Over the last 20 years, we have discovered that we live in a molecular Universe: a Universe with a rich and varied organic inventory; a Universe where molecules are abundant and widespread; a Universe where molecules play a central role in key processes that dominate the structure and evolution of galaxies; a Universe where molecules provide convenient thermometers and barometers to probe local physical conditions. Understanding the origin and evolution of interstellar and circumstellar molecules is therefore key to understanding the Universe around us and our place in it and has therefore become a fundamental goal of modern astrophysics. The field is heavily driven by new observational tools that have become available over the last 20 years; in particular, space-based missions that have opened up the IR and submillimeter window at an ever-accelerating pace. Furthermore, our progress in understanding the Molecular Universe is greatly aided by close collaborations between astronomers, molecular physicists, astrochemists, spectroscopists, and physical chemists who work together in loosely organized networks. In this talk, I will sketch the progress that we have made over the last 20 years and outline some of the challenges that are facing us. The focus will be on understanding the unique and complex organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation that may well represent the prebiotic roots to life.

A PHOTOIONIZATION REFLECTRON TIME-OF-FLIGHT INVESTIGATION OF PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN EXTRATERRESTRIAL ICES – Andrew M. Turner,* Cornelia Meinert, Ralf I. Kaiser (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

Multiple phosphorus-containing compounds have been detected in the Solar System (planetary atmospheres, comets, meteorites) along with interstellar and circumstellar environments. Of particular astrobiological interest are alkyl phosphonic acids (RH2PO3, R = methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl) extracted from the Murchison meteorite. These phosphonic acids are the only extraterrestrial phosphorus-containing organic compounds thus far discovered and offer a bioavailable and highly soluble form of phosphorus. This project investigates the synthesis of phosphorus-containing products of electron-irradiated interstellar ice analogues containing phosphine (PH3), water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrocarbons such as methane (CH4). Phosphine is known to exist in circumstellar envelopes (IRC +10216), has been considered for comets (67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko), and may serve as the phosphorus source of complex organic compounds such as the alkyl phosphonic acids. Utilizing in situ analysis techniques such as quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), tunable-photoionization reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-ReTOF-MS), and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in addition to ex situ analysis by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOF-MS), the intermediates and products of these irradiated ice analogues are characterized to demonstrate the potential to synthesize organic phosphine-containing molecules in astrophysical environments. Notable results include phosphanes (PxHx+2), methylphosphanes (CH3PxHx+1), and phosphorus oxoacids (H3POx, x=1–4, and pyrophosphoric acid (H4P2O7) along with their alkylated equivalents such as prebiotically significant methylphosphonic acid (CH3P(O)(OH)2) and methylphosphate (CH3OP(O)(OH)2).
*Dr. Turner is the 2020 recipient of the Astrochemistry Subdivision Dissertation Award.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A RECORDING OF THIS EVENT.

(Intro at 0:00; Dr. Turner at 4:50; Dr. Tielens at 26:30)


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The Astrochemistry Subdivision of the American Chemical Society sponsors a monthly seminar series that features the work of astrochemists from around the world, including senior experts in the field, postdocs, and students. The seminar series will feature both invited and contributed talks. To submit an abstract to be considered as a 15-minute contributed talk for a future event, please complete this form or email acs.astrochem@gmail.com.